Posts Tagged ‘Malware

07
Jul
10

Google’s China webpage licence under review

NEWS
Google’s China webpage licence under review

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

••• Google Inc’s application to renew its Chinese Website license (Internet Content Provider license) is currently under review, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology said yesterday.

But the ministry didn’t give a deadline for the license review.

It was the Chinese regulator’s latest response regarding the fate of Google China, which recently stopped redirecting automatically web searchers on China’s mainland to its Hong Kong site and applied to renew its license in the world’s largest Internet market last month.

“Google’s annual check-in is under way but there’s no detailed deadline for the result because its submission is relatively late,” said ministry spokesperson Wang Lijian.

The ministry is the body responsible for renewing and reviewing Internet content provider licenses.

Google shut down its mainland-based search engine on March 22 and rerouted users to its Hong Kong site.

It stopped the automatic redirect because regulators told the company its Internet license would not be renewed if it kept it going.

“We re-applied for the license at the end of last month and we are waiting for the results now,” said Marsha Wang, Google China’s spokesperson.

At present, only “music,” “translate” and “shopping” links, in Chinese, appear on the Google China webpage.

Visitors to google.cn will also see a tab that says, in English, “We have moved to google.com.hk.”

Clicking on that takes users to the Chinese-language site in Hong Kong.

Google clearly doesn’t want to give up the Chinese market, with more than 300 million netizens on the mainland. On the other hand, it has said it does not want to subject its Web searches to what it considers censorship under Chinese law.
• Latest News & Headlines » Home «
Share

31
Mar
10

Google searches turn up empty

NEWS
Google searches turn up empty

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Internet users on the Chinese mainland who tried to conduct a Google search Tuesday most likely failed to obtain results while mobile services users reported partial blocking during the last two days.

Last week, users who attempted to use Google.cn were redirected to the Hong Kong website.

Users found out Tuesday that both the English site, Google.com, and the Chinese version of the search engine failed to return search results, although the homepages popped up.

AFP reported that its Shanghai reporter experienced no problems with the Google search engine.

But an Internet user in Shanghai said no search results came up.

The advanced search icon on both the English and Chinese sites were accessible.

A Google spokeswoman in Beijing told that they were aware of the problem but she was not able to say what caused it.

In the wake of Google’s decision to redirect Google.cn traffic to its Hong Kong website last week, Google also set up a website www.google.com/prc/report.html that was still accessible on the mainland Tuesday.

It provided daily status reports on the availability of its other popular services in China, including Doc, News, Mobile, Gmail, Blogger and Picasa service.

According to that website, Google’s search engine service on the Chinese mainland experienced “no issues” Tuesday but the mobile service was partially blocked on the mainland since Sunday.

The Google search engine on a reporter’s mobile phone, which uses Google’s Android mobile phone system, was working normally after it rerouted to Google’s Hong Kong sites in Wi-fi connections.

But Google search, maps and news service could not be accessed with the same mobile phone when it uses China Mobile GPRS data connection.
• Source(s): Xinhua News Agency & Global Times (China)
Share

31
Mar
10

Google blames China’s ‘great firewall’ for blocking searches

NEWS
Google blames China’s ‘great firewall’ for blocking searches

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Google’s search sites in China abruptly stopped working yesterday, but the explanation for the outage changed as the day wore on.

The Internet giant first blamed its own engineers, citing a technical glitch, but later reversed course and pointed to the heavy hand of China’s “Great Firewall” – even as service appeared to be back to normal.

The evolving explanation caught Google watchers by surprise and showed how fraught with confusion the relationship between China and Google remains.

The episode risks escalating their battle a week after Google stopped censoring its search engine in China.

Google struggled to discern the cause of the massive disruption, in which users received error messages for Google searches from China on the company’s Hong Kong-based search site, Google.com.hk.

Google began routing Chinese Internet users to its Hong Kong site last week as it said it would no longer comply with China’s censoring policies and wouldn’t run a censored Chinese search engine.

Later in the day, Google reversed itself, saying it had made those changes a week earlier.

“So whatever happened to block Google.com.hk must have been as a result of a change in the Great Firewall,” the company said.

Wang Lijian, spokesman for the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, one of China’s main Internet regulators, said he was unaware of any Google disruption.

Any permanent blockage of Google’s searches by China would deal a sharp blow to the company’s hopes of continuing to operate part of its business in the country after dismantling its censored Chinese site.

Google said last week that it hoped to maintain its music search and maps services in China, along with sales and research-and-development operations.

Beijing has expressed anger at Google for publicly flouting its censorship regime, and a decision to block access to Google entirely has always been considered possible.

Many analysts have believed Beijing would stop short of that for fear of infuriating Google’s tens of millions of regular Chinese users, not to mention foreign businesses that require access to information.

Because Google censored its old Chinese site, Google.cn, in accordance with government rules, that site wasn’t filtered by the government’s firewall.

Its international sites, such as the Hong Kong one, have always been subjected to filtering, meaning that Chinese users’ searches of some sensitive terms like those related to the 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy protests, the initials RFA, for Radio Free Asia, or even the names of top leaders might trigger an error message from the browser instead of a results page.

Share

29
Mar
10

Microsoft rushes to patch zero-day IE hole

NEWS
Microsoft rushes to patch zero-day IE hole

Monday, March 29, 2010
Last modification: Tuesday, March 30, 2010: 1:05 p.m. PDT

••• Microsoft is releasing an out-of-band patch to address a vulnerability in Internet Explorer 6 and 7 on Tuesday, which if exploited would allow an attacker to compromise the targeted system. In addition to the patch addressing the widely known flaw, MS10-018 will also correct nine other vulnerabilities.

“We have been monitoring this issue and have determined an out-of-band release is needed to protect customers,” Microsoft said in a statement.

Discovered earlier this month, the flaw in Internet Explorer is caused due to a use-after-free error in iepeers.dll when handling invalid values passed to the “setAttribute” function. If exploited, the attacker would have control over the system at the permissions level of the current user. Considering most users are logged in as an administrator on their systems, the issue quickly gained notoriety.

While Microsoft said that users of Internet Explorer 8 and Windows 7 are not vulnerable, the fact that the majority of their users are open to attack caused them to push the timeline up some for the patch.

“The last time Microsoft issued an out of band patch for IE was in January, and it was for the ‘Aurora’ bug that was used to exploit Google, Adobe and other large enterprises. Given that Microsoft’s regular patch is only 15 days away, an out-of-band patch definitely means there is a serious uptick in attacks against this bug in the wild,” said Andrew Storms, Director of Security Operations for nCircle.

“Microsoft’s turnaround time on this bug was very impressive. Generally, it takes at least 30 days from advisory to bug fix release. Microsoft released the advisory on March 9th, just three weeks ago.”

Each of the ten updates in MS10-018 will be listed as Critical by Redmond, and they expect them to hit systems by 1:00 p.m. PDT on March 30.

• Microsoft Security Bulletin MS10-018 – Critical •
• Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer (980182)

▪ Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for March 2010
▪ Internet Explorer Cumulative Update Releasing Out-of-Band
• Source(s): Microsoft Corporation
Share




Calendar

October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Archives

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2 other followers

© Copyright 2010 Dominic Stoughton. All Rights reserved.

Dominic Stoughton's Blog